Direct From The Dentist: What Too Much Soda Does To Your Teeth

Most people are aware that soda isn’t the best for your overall health. Not only is soda linked to type 2 diabetes, weight gain, and obesity, but did you know that it can have a severe impact on your teeth? Well, your friendly local dentist at Taylor Cosmetic Dental is here to tell you all about how too much soda affects your teeth.

How Soda Interacts With Your Teeth And Mouth

Before we jump right in, let’s lay some groundwork information. First, there are hundreds of types of bacteria which live in your mouth. A lot of this bacteria is helpful and assists in breaking down your food and helps clean your mouth to a certain extent. However, there are harmful bacteria that come to eat leftover food particles, especially sugar, and that bacteria excrete acid that wears down the enamel of your teeth.

So, you already have acid being created in your mouth by these bacteria, then you add soda. All types of soda, both full sugar as well as sugar-free soda, have their own acid. The acid from the soda adds to the wear and tear that the bacteria starts, leading to significant dental damage. Also, as the sugar in soda interacts with the bacteria in your mouth, it creates another type of acid which can hurt your teeth.

Also, you may think, “Well, I’ll just use a straw! Then the soda won’t hit my teeth.” While it’s not a bad thought, it doesn’t really work that way. Since the straw doesn’t go from your cup to your throat, some of the soda will interact with your teeth, especially your back molars.

What Soda Does To Your Teeth

Okay, now that you have a clear idea about how soda and bacteria produce acid that harms your teeth, let’s talk about exactly what kind of damage we are talking about.

Soda erodes your teeth – The outer layer of your teeth is covered in enamel, a hard protective layer for the sensitive dentin and nerves below. When you drink soda, you are giving your enamel an acid bath, which slowly erodes the protective enamel.

Soda strongly contributes to cavities – The wear and tear on your teeth don’t stop at the enamel. As soda erodes the protective enamel of your teeth, the acid can make its way down to the next layer, which is the dentin. Once these openings in your teeth are made, cavities are a natural result, and you will need our dentist’s services to resolve the cavities and other issues that can arise.

Ways To Prevent Dental Damage From Soda

There are several ways you can prevent soda from damaging your teeth. Below are some of the top things that our dentist Dr. Taylor recommends:

  • Lower soda consumption – Moderation in all things, especially your soda consumption, can significantly help your teeth. Do your best to stick to one soda a day to help give your teeth a break from the sugar and acid bath that comes with soda.
  • Rinse with water – Immediately after you finish a soda, rinse your mouth out by drinking water. The neutral quality of water can help lessen the impact of your soda and help wash away the acid and sugar. In fact, if you can keep water handy to sip on after drinking a soda, you can also prevent getting up for another soda.
  • Stick to scheduled dental cleanings – If you are a regular soda drinker, then it is even more important that you come into our dental office for your biannual dental cleaning. That way, any issues which crop up can be caught early before they become a big issue.
  • Don’t sip soda – As you drink your soda, don’t slowly sip on it. By sipping soda over the course of an hour or more, you are constantly bathing your teeth in acid and sugar, inviting more bacteria and acid to build up and damage your teeth. So, if you are going to drink soda, do it quickly.
  • Use a straw – While we did say using a straw won’t protect you completely, it does offer some protection at least for your front teeth. By using a straw, you can minimize how much of your teeth come in contact with the corrosive soda acid.
  • Avoid soda before bed – Drinking soda before bed is probably one of the more harmful ways to consume soda since the acid will sit on your teeth as you sleep. So, if you want something to drink by your bedside, stick to water.
  • Wait to brush teeth – It may seem counterintuitive, but you shouldn’t brush your teeth right after drinking soda. With the soda acid on your teeth, your teeth are more vulnerable, and the bristles of your toothbrush can create harmful friction against your teeth, leading to more damage. It’s best to wait at least 30 minutes to an hour after drinking soda before brushing your teeth.

If you are prepared to come in for your dental cleaning and have your teeth checked by Dr. Taylor, contact us. We are ready to help you reach your healthiest and ideal smile!

Are Veneers Or Invisalign Better?

As a skilled cosmetic dentist, Dr. Taylor is often asked whether veneers or Invisalign are better for reaching the perfect smile. The problem with this question is that it’s not asking the right question, as these two cosmetic dental procedures do different things to improve your smile.

To help clear things up if you have been wondering whether Invisalign or veneers are the right routes for you, we wanted to provide a thorough breakdown of what these two dental procedures are meant for, the main differences between them, their pros and cons, and finally, how you can decide whether Invisalign or veneers are right for your needs.

What Do Veneers Do vs. Invisalign

As we have said, these two cosmetic dental procedures have different purposes. Invisalign is meant to work just like invisible braces, straightening your teeth for a more even appearance. As Invisalign shifts your teeth, things like bite issues, crowding, and gaps can be corrected.

The invisible aligners that shift your teeth need to be replaced regularly to ensure that the progress continues. Aside from movement, Invisalign does not provide other visible cosmetic benefits.

In contrast, veneers focus on changing the visual impact of your teeth. This change is done usually with porcelain veneers, which require that your tooth be shaped and have a thin sheet of porcelain overlaying your natural tooth. There are also no-prep veneers, which require little-to-no tooth shaping needed and can be quickly applied. For most of this article, we will be focusing on porcelain veneers, but we felt it was important that you are aware that there are multiple options available when it comes to veneers.

No matter what type of veneer you choose, their basic purpose is the same. Veneers are meant to do things like cover up dental damage, change the color of teeth, as well as altering the shape and surface of your teeth.

Major Difference Between Veneers And Invisalign

As you can see, the main goal of these two procedures is different. But, just knowing that may not be enough for you to decide between the two if you don’t understand their major differences.

Price of Invisalign vs. Veneers

Right out the gate, porcelain veneers can sound far more appealing, as they can cost between $925-$2,500 per tooth, where Invisalign costs on average $5,000.

The price gap begins to even out if you need multiple veneers, though if you only need one or two veneers to improve the appearance of your teeth, then it makes sense to choose veneers over Invisalign. However, if you have many teeth or bite issues, it can make more sense to choose Invisalign to correct the problems, rather than veneers.

Current Dental Health

You need to have healthy teeth and gums no matter which of these treatment paths you end up pursuing. However, if you often have cavities, it may not be the best idea to pursue veneers, as veneers are placed over the teeth and may hide future cavities.

Also, veneers require the removal of a good deal of enamel to have the veneers sit correctly. This removal can cause future problems as the enamel acts as a protective layer between the inner dentin of your teeth and the bacteria which lives in your mouth. If that layer is reduced and you are already prone to cavities and infections, it can up the number of cavities you experience.

Length of Treatment

When it comes to the amount of time it takes to have the cosmetic treatment done, veneers are far and away quicker than Invisalign.

With veneers, you really only need two visits, as long as your oral health is good. The first visit will be a consultation with Dr. Taylor, and the second will be when your veneers are placed. This process is a speedy way to improve your smile.

On the other hand, Invisalign typically takes about a year to complete. Sometimes it takes longer, depending on the severity of the misalignment of your teeth.

Pros And Cons of Invisalign And Veneers

By now, you likely have a pretty good grasp on which of these cosmetic dentistry treatments may be right for you. But before you completely make up your mind, you may want to consider the clear pros and cons of both Invisalign and veneers.

Pros and Cons of Invisalign

The majority of these pros and cons are in contrast to traditional metal braces. So, keep that in mind when you consider the pros and cons of Invisalign.

Pros
The aligners are basically invisible
There are no food restrictions
Nothing poking your mouth
Aligns teeth faster
Invisalign trays can be taken out

Cons
Aligners can become lost when taken out
Can take time to adjust to wearing aligners
Proper treatment relies on correct aligner usage
Need to clean your teeth more often
Can be as expensive as braces, or more so
Does not change color, shape or appearance of teeth

Pros and Cons of Veneers

Veneers have more straightforward pros and cons. However, as we mentioned before, there are several types of veneers, so if you are interested in them, you will want to talk with Dr. Taylor about which type of veneer is best for you.

Pros
Last on average 15 years
Boost confidence quickly
Able to protect damaged teeth
Fills in gaps and spaces
Choose the shape and color
Corrects misshapen teeth

Cons

Won’t prevent future dental issues
Can become chipped or cracked
Once placed, the procedure can’t be reversed
Natural teeth and veneers have a color difference
Are Veneers Or Invisalign Right For You

After reviewing what veneers and Invisalign are for, as well as their pros and cons, you likely have a good idea about which cosmetic dentistry procedure is right for you. However, to be sure, you can always have a consultation with Dr. Taylor.

If you would like to consult with Dr. Taylor to determine what cosmetic dental procedures will help reach your ideal smile, contact us today to set up your appointment.

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT:406.652.9204